If I get a vasectomy, how long can I freeze my sperm?

Does freezing my sperm affect the ability to conceive?

Answers from doctors (16)


More About Doctor Ranjith Ramasamy M.D.

Published on Jan 08, 2019

You can freeze sperm before the vasectomy, and they're typically good for 20-30 years. You need frozen sperm to conceive using assisted reproduction techniques like intrauterine insemination or in vitro fertilization. Those sperms will be examined for concentration and motility

Answered by Ranjith Ramasamy M.D. (View Profile)

You can freeze sperm before the vasectomy, and they're typically good for 20-30 years. You need frozen sperm to conceive using assisted reproduction techniques like intrauterine insemination or in vitro fertilization. Those sperms will be examined for concentration and motility

Published on Jul 11, 2012


More About Doctor John C. McHugh, MD

Published on Dec 30, 2018

I had to look this up. This is from a sperm banking company: "Cryopreserved specimens, when properly stored, will remain viable for an indefinite amount of time. Pregnancies have been reported for cases in which the sperm has been stored for 20 years prior to thawing and insemination."

Couples should consider a vasectomy permanent, however, if you have doubts and still want to proceed, I commonly suggest having the sperm preserved. You can search your area. Fees vary but average around $300.00 a year.

Answered by John C. McHugh, MD (View Profile)

I had to look this up. This is from a sperm banking company: "Cryopreserved specimens, when properly stored, will remain viable for an indefinite amount of time. Pregnancies have been reported for cases in which the sperm has been stored for 20 years prior to thawing and insemination."

Couples should consider a vasectomy permanent, however, if you have doubts and still want to proceed, I commonly suggest having the sperm preserved. You can search your area. Fees vary but average around $300.00 a year.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


You can freeze your sperm almost indefinitely if you collect before or immediately after a vasectomy. Frozen sperm can be used successfully at a later date with many assisted fertility techniques like in vitro fertilization.

Answered by Mark J. Saslawsky, MD - Southaven Office (View Profile)

You can freeze your sperm almost indefinitely if you collect before or immediately after a vasectomy. Frozen sperm can be used successfully at a later date with many assisted fertility techniques like in vitro fertilization.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Wayne B. Glazier, MD, FACS

Published on Dec 07, 2018

Indefinitely. There is a yearly fee for storage.

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Answered by Wayne B. Glazier, MD, FACS

Indefinitely. There is a yearly fee for storage.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Christopher P. Fontenot, MD

Published on Jun 23, 2015

1) Frozen sperm can be used indefinitely.
2) There have been no good studies directly comparing pregnancy rates with natural conception vs. use of frozen sperm. There have been some studies comparing pregnancy rates with frozen vs. fresh sperm for intrauterine insemination, which demonstrate a clear advantage for fresh sperm.
In general, if you are thinking of freezing sperm prior to a vasectomy, you are not 100% certain that you don't wish to conceive a child in the future. In those circumstances, I would recommend deferring your vasectomy until you are sure.

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Answered by Christopher P. Fontenot, MD

1) Frozen sperm can be used indefinitely.
2) There have been no good studies directly comparing pregnancy rates with natural conception vs. use of frozen sperm. There have been some studies comparing pregnancy rates with frozen vs. fresh sperm for intrauterine insemination, which demonstrate a clear advantage for fresh sperm.
In general, if you are thinking of freezing sperm prior to a vasectomy, you are not 100% certain that you don't wish to conceive a child in the future. In those circumstances, I would recommend deferring your vasectomy until you are sure.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Christopher Keel, DO

Published on May 16, 2015

This is a very common question.

While most couples will use sperm within a few years of collection. There are reports of "banked" sperm being used 2-3 decades later.

So, I guess we may never know how long, but my estimation would be that it could out live you.

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Answered by Christopher Keel, DO

This is a very common question.

While most couples will use sperm within a few years of collection. There are reports of "banked" sperm being used 2-3 decades later.

So, I guess we may never know how long, but my estimation would be that it could out live you.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Anshu S. Guleria, MD

Published on May 15, 2015

Theoretically forever. However, the cost for storage might be an issue. Ask a local fertility clinic about sperm banking.

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Answered by Anshu S. Guleria, MD

Theoretically forever. However, the cost for storage might be an issue. Ask a local fertility clinic about sperm banking.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Hugh B. Perkin, MD

Published on May 14, 2015

You would have to freeze your sperm prior to vasectomy, and the duration of viability depends on the site and conditions. Generally sperm viability decreases over several years. However, if you are considering having more children, you may want to consider other birth control options. Vas reversal and in vitro fertilization can be expensive and do not always work.

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Answered by Hugh B. Perkin, MD

You would have to freeze your sperm prior to vasectomy, and the duration of viability depends on the site and conditions. Generally sperm viability decreases over several years. However, if you are considering having more children, you may want to consider other birth control options. Vas reversal and in vitro fertilization can be expensive and do not always work.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


I think indefinitely but not sure. This question is best answered by an sperm bank or an infertility specialist who perform IVF.

Answered by Farhad B. Nowzari, MD, FACS (View Profile)

I think indefinitely but not sure. This question is best answered by an sperm bank or an infertility specialist who perform IVF.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


More About Doctor Mark Sigman, MD

Published on May 13, 2015

Once frozen, sperm have an indefinite lifetime and may be used for insemination or IVF for over 20 years.

Answered by Mark Sigman, MD (View Profile)

Once frozen, sperm have an indefinite lifetime and may be used for insemination or IVF for over 20 years.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Sheldon H.F. Marks, MD

Published on May 13, 2015

Actually freezing sperm before vasectomy is a smart choice, as more than one in 20 men will change their mind and want to father more children at some point in the future. This is especially true for young men and those who had not fathered any children. Frozen sperm are healthy when used and will last for decades. Seek out a top andrology lab that specializes in male fertility and banking.

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Answered by Sheldon H.F. Marks, MD

Actually freezing sperm before vasectomy is a smart choice, as more than one in 20 men will change their mind and want to father more children at some point in the future. This is especially true for young men and those who had not fathered any children. Frozen sperm are healthy when used and will last for decades. Seek out a top andrology lab that specializes in male fertility and banking.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Larry I. Lipshultz, MD

Published on May 13, 2015

Sperm can be frozen indefinitely and will still be effective.

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Answered by Larry I. Lipshultz, MD

Sperm can be frozen indefinitely and will still be effective.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Marvin L. Stein, MD, FACS

Published on May 13, 2015

Sperm banks vary upon how long they keep sperm,
usually 10% are lost yearly.

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Answered by Marvin L. Stein, MD, FACS

Sperm banks vary upon how long they keep sperm,
usually 10% are lost yearly.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Guy T. Bernstein, MD, FACS

Published on May 13, 2015

Frozen sperm are nearly as effective as fresh sperm with regard to Fertility.

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Answered by Guy T. Bernstein, MD, FACS

Frozen sperm are nearly as effective as fresh sperm with regard to Fertility.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Stephen F. Shaban, MD

Published on May 13, 2015

Sperm can actually be cryopreserved indefinitely.

It's important to remember that whatever you freeze, only about half of it will survive. So if you freeze great quality sperm, then some good sperm should survive. If you freeze bad sperm, then there might not be anything left to thaw.

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Answered by Stephen F. Shaban, MD

Sperm can actually be cryopreserved indefinitely.

It's important to remember that whatever you freeze, only about half of it will survive. So if you freeze great quality sperm, then some good sperm should survive. If you freeze bad sperm, then there might not be anything left to thaw.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Douglas L. Gaker, MD

Published on May 13, 2015

Frozen sperm can remain viable for many years when properly handled. The following websites offer detailed information in regard to your question: www.spermbankdirectory.com/frozen-sperm-efficacy and www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/getting-pregnant/expert

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Answered by Douglas L. Gaker, MD

Frozen sperm can remain viable for many years when properly handled. The following websites offer detailed information in regard to your question: www.spermbankdirectory.com/frozen-sperm-efficacy and www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/getting-pregnant/expert

Published on Jul 11, 2012


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