Is it possible to retrieve sperm from the testes after a vasectomy has been done? My new husband had a vasectomy 18 years ago.

We don’t really want to go the vasectomy reversal route.

ANSWERS FROM DOCTORS (7)


Answered by Mark J. Saslawsky, MD - Southaven Office

Yes. A qualified urologist can retrieve sperm form the testicles (TESA) of epididymis (MESA) to use for In vitro Fertilization (IVF)

Published on Oct 25, 2017

Answered by Mark J. Saslawsky, MD - Southaven Office (View Profile)

Yes. A qualified urologist can retrieve sperm form the testicles (TESA) of epididymis (MESA) to use for In vitro Fertilization (IVF)

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Answered by Mark L. Fallick, MD

Yes, typically sperm can be retrieved from the epididymis or testicles and used as part of an in vitro fertilization attempt. The exact procedure depends somewhat on the patient's history and exam.
I recommend evaluation by a Urologist who specializes in male fertility.

Published on Oct 25, 2017

Answered by Mark L. Fallick, MD (View Profile)

Yes, typically sperm can be retrieved from the epididymis or testicles and used as part of an in vitro fertilization attempt. The exact procedure depends somewhat on the patient's history and exam.
I recommend evaluation by a Urologist who specializes in male fertility.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Answered by Robert G. Pugach, M.D.

There are 2 possible ways to obtain speed after a vasectomy if, for some reason, a reversal is not desired. 1) TESA - a sperm aspiration procedure can be done with a local anesthetic. A needle is placed in the epididymis and sperm are aspirated out and frozen. 2) TESE - epididymal tissue is harvested and then sperm can be isolated and frozen. Both methods require sperm freezing with subsequent assisted reproductive technologies like IVF. For most couples, a vasectomy reversal can be a simpler and more economical answer.

Published on Oct 25, 2017

//imgs-origin.edoctors.com/imageresizer/image/user_uploads/58x58_85-1/doctors/8461_1503352272.jpg
Answered by Robert G. Pugach, M.D.

There are 2 possible ways to obtain speed after a vasectomy if, for some reason, a reversal is not desired. 1) TESA - a sperm aspiration procedure can be done with a local anesthetic. A needle is placed in the epididymis and sperm are aspirated out and frozen. 2) TESE - epididymal tissue is harvested and then sperm can be isolated and frozen. Both methods require sperm freezing with subsequent assisted reproductive technologies like IVF. For most couples, a vasectomy reversal can be a simpler and more economical answer.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Answered by Shane T. Russell, MD - Cincinnati Office

Yes, sperm can be removed from the testicle with a small aspiration/extraction procedure. The key point to know is that extracted sperm must then be used in combination with IVF/ICSI (in vitro fertilization). It cannot just be inseminated into the women's uterus (intrauterine insemination) as this approach is uniformly ineffective in producing a pregnancy when surgically extracted sperm are used.

Published on Oct 25, 2017

Answered by Shane T. Russell, MD - Cincinnati Office (View Profile)

Yes, sperm can be removed from the testicle with a small aspiration/extraction procedure. The key point to know is that extracted sperm must then be used in combination with IVF/ICSI (in vitro fertilization). It cannot just be inseminated into the women's uterus (intrauterine insemination) as this approach is uniformly ineffective in producing a pregnancy when surgically extracted sperm are used.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Answered by Steven K. Sterzer, MD

Yes. Sperm can be aspirated from the epididymis of one of the testes then be prepared for artificial insemination. This is best done at a full service infertility clinic for maximum results. A point or two about vasectomy reversals: They are more likely to achieve pregnancy when done by a well trained and experienced specialist and at a much lower cost. Even if this fails there is a greater than 90% chance there will be sperm in the ejacualate that is of better quality than epididymal sperm procurement, and is much easier to process for artificial insemination. Eighteen years is a long time but the chance of success is a good 30% to 40% by reversal method

Published on Oct 25, 2017

Answered by Steven K. Sterzer, MD (View Profile)

Yes. Sperm can be aspirated from the epididymis of one of the testes then be prepared for artificial insemination. This is best done at a full service infertility clinic for maximum results. A point or two about vasectomy reversals: They are more likely to achieve pregnancy when done by a well trained and experienced specialist and at a much lower cost. Even if this fails there is a greater than 90% chance there will be sperm in the ejacualate that is of better quality than epididymal sperm procurement, and is much easier to process for artificial insemination. Eighteen years is a long time but the chance of success is a good 30% to 40% by reversal method

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Answered by John C. McHugh, MD

Yes and the clinics that do the in vitro type procedures are where you'd start. The success however diminishes with time and can be dependent on whether obstructive pressures have affected the production of sperm. These doctors will often times aspirate fluid and then examine for the quality and number of sperm. If suitable they can be frozen and then used. If you Google reproductive clinic and or sperm aspiration you'll find a plethora of information or even call a reproductive clinic hotline. As a rule urologists are not involved with this.

Published on Oct 25, 2017

Answered by John C. McHugh, MD (View Profile)

Yes and the clinics that do the in vitro type procedures are where you'd start. The success however diminishes with time and can be dependent on whether obstructive pressures have affected the production of sperm. These doctors will often times aspirate fluid and then examine for the quality and number of sperm. If suitable they can be frozen and then used. If you Google reproductive clinic and or sperm aspiration you'll find a plethora of information or even call a reproductive clinic hotline. As a rule urologists are not involved with this.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Answered by Amin S. Herati, M.D.

Yes, either through needle aspiration or through an incision of the testis, sperm can be extracted. Sperm production does not halt with age.

Published on Oct 25, 2017

//imgs-origin.edoctors.com/imageresizer/image/user_uploads/58x58_85-1/doctors/8458_1502907749.jpg
Answered by Amin S. Herati, M.D.

Yes, either through needle aspiration or through an incision of the testis, sperm can be extracted. Sperm production does not halt with age.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Related Questions for General

General -3 answers
My husband had a vasectomy 6 years ago before we were ever together. We want to have a baby together but he does not want to have to go through the pain of reversal due to pain meds ineffective and had to feel everything during vasectomy. Is there a relatively inexpensive way to extract the sperm and not have to reverse the vasectomy?
See More
General -2 answers
The left side of my vasectomy required a larger incision for some reason and it appears the scrotum skin has been folded over when it was sutured. At one end of the incision there seems to be a small lump but it may just be the skin. It's been four days now since the procedure was completed. What should I do, relax and wait a week? Go see the doctor now?
See More
General -1 answer
I saw a line below one of my boyfriend's testicles. Is it possible he had a vasectomy and didn't tell me? How would I know if he had a vasectomy? Are there any tell-tale signs to look for?
See More
General -1 answer
Start up company in Denmark have developed medical device and method, without surgery or hormones. Tested on animals with success. Have anybody in the US heard about this new contraception for men?
See More
General -2 answers
All 400 to 600 of them, that is.
See More
General -1 answer
What is the possibility to go through TESE to find good sperms enough to be used for IVF from the person who had vasectomy about 20 years ago? He went through PESA but the doctors did not find any live sperms. For the background information, he was a heavy smoker for 20 years. ( 2 packs a day for 20 years) He still smokes about a pack a day. I am sure that smoking causes a lot of health issues including the quality of his sperms. Other than that he is healthy for now.
See More
General -1 answer
What I mean is if you have a testicular torsion, could that lead to having to have a vasectomy?
See More
General -1 answer
My left testicle is roughly twice the size of my right due to the surgery. I'm not sure the exact details of what they did but they went in and secured it to ensure there would not be a recurrence.
See More
General -1 answer
I had a scrotal hematoma on my right testicle 2 years ago. It's the same size as the other one but at the spot of the strike it feels sore certain ways that it's touched. Could this be nerve damage, or what could it be?
See More
General -3 answers
I am a Single man. I'm 58 years old. I'm not Sexually Active even though I've have masturbated. Should I have a vasectomy? I think if I were to marry at this age in my life that I'm too old to Father any Children. I'm too strict.
See More
General -1 answer
I want something that can prevent the formation of sperm or kill them.
See More
Have specific questions?
ASK A DOCTOR

Suggested Doctors

Sorry, there are no matching doctors in your area
Please choose a different location

,

,

See more Suggested Doctors

Related Articles