Featured Doctor

Karen Boyle, MD

Baltimore, MD 21204

877-290-5055

Does a Vasectomy Reduce Sex Drive?

Sex after a vasectomy shouldn't be any different than it was before the procedure. The surgery doesn't touch the blood vessels or nerves involved in erections and ejaculation, and it doesn't reduce a man's ability to have or enjoy sex. It only eliminates fertility. Vasectomy should have no effect on:

  • Sex drive
  • The ability to have or maintain erections
  • Ejaculation
  • Orgasms
  • Testosterone level

Sex drive after a vasectomy

Testicles produce the male hormone testosterone, which plays an important role in maintaining a man's libido. The vasectomy procedure only impacts the flow of sperm through the vas deferens and doesn't change the amount of testosterone the testicles release into the bloodstream. Testosterone levels post-surgery should be exactly the same as they were before the procedure.

If you notice a drop in sex drive after vasectomy, contact your doctor. This could be caused by other factors, such as:

  • Drug or alcohol abuse
  • Medications, usually SSRI antidepressants such as Prozac or Paxil, or drugs for high blood pressure (such as beta blockers)
  • Fatigue or stress

Erections after a vasectomy

There should be no change in your ability to achieve and maintain erections, because the various vasectomy procedures don't touch the blood vessels or nerves involved. But erectile dysfunction could signal other serious problems, such as heart disease or diabetes. Talk to your doctor if you have difficulty achieving or maintaining an erection post-vasectomy.

Ejaculation after a Vasectomy

Typically, the only thing that's different after a vasectomy is that sperm is missing from the semen. And sperm make up a very small percentage (less than 5 percent) of the ejaculate, so you shouldn't notice any change in its color or consistency. The glands that produce most of the semen--such as the seminal vesicles and the prostate--function exactly as they did before the procedure.

Reviewed October 28, 2012 by - Urologist

 

References

Bartz D., & Greenberg J.A. Sterilization in the United States. Rev Obstet Gynecol. 2008; 1(1):23-32.

Bertero E., Hallak J., Gromatzky C., et al. Assessment of sexual function in patients undergoing vasectomy using the international index of erectile function. Int Braz J Urol. 2005; 31(5):452-8.

Cutie C.J., & Ongaro T.J. Patient information: Vasectomy (Beyond the Basics). UpToDate. 2012.

Glina S., Sharlip I.D., & Hellstrom W.J. Modifying Risk Factors to Prevent and Treat Erectile Dysfunction. J Sex Med. 2012; 10(1):115-119.

Schwingl P.J., Guess H.A. Safety and effectiveness of vasectomy. Fertil Steril. 2000; 73(5):923-936.

More Articles

  • Sex after a Vasectomy

    Vasectomy sterilization raises questions about a number of sensitive issues surrounding sex, scarring and recovery. Find answers to some of the most common questions about sex and sex drive after a vasectomy.

  • What to Expect From the Vasectomy Procedure

    Discover how vasectomy procedures are done. See vasectomy related pictures and learn about the quick vasectomy recover time.

  • Vasectomy Reversal Risks, Complications, and Side Effects

    Learn about possible vasectomy reversal complications and risks. Though problems are rare, some vasectomy reversal risks include infection, swelling, bleeding and testicular pain.